2.9.98

Call: 9:30 AM

Making CherryHow_to_Make_One.jpg (6004 bytes)
a romantic comedy starring Shalom Harlow
"All is art...the rest is graham crackers."
--High School Confidential
You've Got Questions? Cherry Has Answers
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Locations:
The Church

Weather: Mostly sunny. Hi: 39 Low: 28.

Principals:
Leila, Evy, Ernest, Mammy, Menu Man, Red, Jack
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Half Time

Is the glass half full of Cherry pits?

Today is the 21st day of production, according to the call sheet, out of a 42 day schedule. As many days have been completed as there are left to go. It's half time.

Well, we don't have an elaborate show for you. No Ice Capades, no Leann Rimes, no million dollar 3-Point Shot. All we have is the ongoing story of a film crew getting back to work after a too-short weekend.

So before we plunge ahead, a quick look back at some Cherry pits.

Scene 71 takes place on Leila's stoop. Eddie, dressed as a Roman gladiator, has Leila tucked inside his cape, she rests her head on his shoulder. That morning she woke up with a massive hangover, and a recognition that while she had been drinking with Eddie the night before--and helpless before him-- he had been a perfect gentleman.

Now, with a bond of trust genuinely made between them, they banter, each seducing the other. It is a lovely scene, charming, playful, and fully felt. Watching Shalom and Donovan together is a pleasure. Just as she and Jake seem to have a deeper potential, but a more brittle surface, she and Donovan have an easygoing amiability that reflects both the script and their real lives. They were friends first, acting partners second.

This confusion, between persons, public personas and acting, is the essence of movie acting. Our interest in the private lives of these public people, whose jobs are to create identifiable emotions so that we might empathize with them, is in part a way of checking whether we're getting the real deal or not.

If you want to be a movie actor, a movie star really, the most essential element is the ability to conflate your public persona with the roles you play. It is that tension, however modest, that fuels the public's imagination, which they transmute into desire: "I got to see that new Matt Damon movie! Now!"

Watching the dailies of Shalom and Donovan playing the scene, it  is easy to get enthusiastic about how beautifully this scene is going to play on the big screen. There are five takes, and each is winning in its own particular way. Not all of them are screenworthy, however.

As Take 3 is ending Spartacus (Eddie) says: "Let's draw the sword," pulling it shamelessly from the scabbard on his belt.

"You would be so shamelessly used?" Leila asks, coyly.

"I'm Spartacus," he declares, manfully, and (as he has the preceding two takes) he moves to lift her into his arms, . Only this time he starts with his knees unbent, and as he pulls her into his arms he stumbles and then grunts, "Nearly."

On the next take everything goes perfectly. Not only are their readings playful and warm, but Donovan lifts Shalom easily, and carries her through the door into her house. The door closes behind them, scene over, but as they step inside and the crane swooshes up into the night sky we can hear their radio mikes.

"That was a good one," Shalom coos enthusiastically. Everybody laughs, and Jon says, "We agree."

Moments later, when she and Donovan emerge Jon says, "One more time." Something about the movement of the crane wasn't perfect. Oh, well.

Richard T

One of the fun spots to hang out these days is Hair and Makeup, where with just a few deft strokes Kyra and Evelyne can make something over into something else entirely.

"You must get his permission," Kyra said.

When I asked, Richard said, "As long as it's nutty."

It is.

___

And finally, I was standing near Video Village the other night when it came up that Terry had never uttered a word my brother won't allow his children to say. Scott's kids say, instead, "flatulate."

"I've never said that word," Terry said.

"Really?" Janna exclaimed. "That part of the script is true?" (It is a characteristic of Leila, as well.)

"It's all true," Terry replied, because that's a good line, not because it's strictly so. "I've written it but I've never said it."

But with hardly a pause Janna came up with a better line:

"Her life was devoted to her Art
  Not once did she ever
  Say the word Fart."

"That goes on my tombstone," Terry declared.

Noted.

   Mail the Cherry Web Man       
Peter Kreutzer  

 

Tuesday

(c) 1998 Peter M. Kreutzer