2.6.98

Call: 3:45 Happy Birthday Julie Robbins!

Making Cherry
a romantic comedy starring Shalom Harlow
"We're out to save the Hollywood film industry."
--Dennis Hopper
You've Got Questions? Cherry Has Answers
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Locations:
Central Park West and 106th St./Lexington and 48th Street

Weather: Mostly cloudy. Hi: 39 Lo:31 will feel colder because of winds

Principals:
Dr. Kirk, Red, Jack, Dog Woman
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Out of Hoboken

Friday Night in NYC

On Friday the whole crew packed up and made its way via caravan from Hoboken, first to the upper west side of New York City, then to the heart of midtown.

The grip truck arrives

The objects of the day are three shots involving stuffed dogs, a limo, Dr. Kirk and two adorable children. To get these the street must be dressed, sprayed with water (the legendary wetdown, which makes the sidewalks glisten with spectral reflection yet also increases the blackness of the pavement), the limo must be positioned, marks established for all the actors, lights set in doorways and down the block and flags and scrims set-up and arranged to block the streetlights that are already there.

The three scenes, #s 26, 46 and 47 if you're keeping score, involve the two orphaned children. Red, the girl, drops her stuffed doggie when she and her brother are tossed from a car by unseen baddies, and leaves it behind.

Later, a limo driving through the park screeches to a halt and a mysterious hand retrieves the doggie. Next, we see the limo glide to a stop outside a nice Italian restaurant in midtown. A giddy couple emerges and dashes inside. Almost immediately the woman comes back into the street and fetches an armful of stuffed dogs from the limo's back seat.

Fetching stuffed dogs

As she returns to the restaurant she drops one dog, which is coincidentally picked up by Dr. Beverly Kirk, who coincidentally is passing by while on a melancholy stroll. He steps over to the window and inside sees the woman and man arranging the stuffed dogs around the table at which they are about to sup.

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It is a fanciful scene, but its airy insouciance (Drenda Spohnholtz, who plays the woman fetching the dogs, cries out as she emerges from the restaurant's revolving door: "We must not forget the children!") is cut by Dr. Kirk's powerful melancholy, which itself is a reflection of the awfulness of seeing children abandoned in the street.

"That was terribly sad to see," Sherri said later, "Very, very sad."

But if the scenes were marked by sadness, the temper of the crew was upbeat. Almost giddy at times. The cold night air eventually insinuates itself no matter how many layers you wear, and once you're cold the only salvation is found in the hand-warmers Amy is passing out. These marvels in a small blue plastic bag give off a helpful amount of heat for hours and hours. If there is any one problem they are a little too hot to keep wrapped up in one's gloves.

I asked Amy if she would prefer to be in New Jersey, where there is always a fairly warm building to duck into. "No," she said, "it's great to be in the city." It was an opinion to which  seemingly everyone but perhaps Kyra, who lives in Hoboken, subscribed.

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Terry Reed had a different reason to feel giddy.

A few years back, when she was in graduate school, she took a screenwriting class with Sam Raphaelson. One of the scene she wrote for an early assignment involved a woman who brought five stuffed dogs along on a date.

"Sam like the scene a lot," she said, "but then I forgot all about it."

Terry's scene was inspired by a beau who had tried to woo her by bringing his own giant stuffed Doberman on a date for her. She was not seduced, but the incident got her an A in screenwriting class.

And now, fifteen years later, nearly the same scene is finally reaching the silver screen.

"It's so cool to see it happening," she said. "But Jonny made it much better. My scene was mostly about the contrast between rich and poor, but he added more. The scene now has more depth to it."

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Which doesn't mean it isn't a little silly, too.

   Mail the Cherry Web Man       
Peter Kreutzer  

 

Monday

(c) 1998 Peter M. Kreutzer